PIMA's Polyiso Blog
Blog Home All Blogs

Energy Savings Go Through the Roof!

Posted By Administration, Monday, November 11, 2019
Updated: Monday, November 11, 2019
When it’s time to replace a roof, most owners choose roofing materials based on performance qualities like longevity and weather resistance. But a well-designed roof can also shine in another performance area: energy efficiency.

Energy efficiency is important to many owners with concerns ranging from climate impacts like building carbon footprints to the costs and reliability of energy resources. Since approximately 25 percent of heat loss in an uninsulated building occurs through the roof, choosing materials that add insulative power can add significant energy savings. For commercial and low-slope roof applications, adding layers of rigid foam insulation to the roofing system can deliver exceptional R-value without a lot of bulk.

An article last month from the Energy News Network details initiatives in Warren, Minnesota and Arnsberg, Germany to use thermal imaging in evaluating building heat loss to help owners determine the best energy efficiency opportunities.

The program was conceived after municipal leaders from Warren and Arnsberg met through the Climate-Smart Municipalities program sponsored by the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment which paired five cities in Minnesota with similar cities in Germany. Arnsberg had been using remote-piloted aircraft to collect thermal images of building heat loss. Leaders in Warren decided to try using drones to get more detailed information.

Piggybacking off each other’s ideas, the two cities are innovating the practical applications of these thermal images in directing energy efficiency efforts to the places that will have the greatest impact. Their research provides further evidence that reroofing with energy-efficient materials can decrease building heat loss and lead to reduced energy consumption.

Tags:  building envelope  buildings  continuous insulation  Efficiency  energy efficiency  insulation  Polyiso 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

PIMA Technical Bulletin #304: Energy Efficiency with Polyiso Continuous Insulation (CI)

Posted By Administration, Monday, November 4, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, October 23, 2019
Technical Bulletin #304 discusses how to use Polyiso CI (with foil or coated glass facer) to provide a continuous layer of insulation on the exterior of homes with wood or steel framing to minimize thermal bridges. Architectural images depict insulation covering the entire opaque wall surface that demonstrate significant increases in the overall thermal performance and energy efficiency of a home using Polyiso CI.
 
Thermal images highlight the temperature distribution and heat flux through wood and steel frame wall sections both with and without Polyiso CI and demonstrate an improved overall effective R-value. The technical bulletin also discusses Polyiso CI’s features and benefits related to attic, roof, foundation, and slab applications. A “Key Facts” summary provides a convenient reference of the important information contained in this document. A link to PIMA Technical Bulletin #304 is found here.
 

Tags:  building envelope  buildings  continuous insulation  insulation  Polyiso 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

PIMA Technical Bulletin #303: Moisture Control with Polyiso Continuous Insulation (CI)

Posted By Administration, Thursday, October 31, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, October 23, 2019
Technical Bulletin #303 contains important information about the use of Polyiso CI (with foil or coated glass facer) when used as a continuous layer of insulation on the exterior of a home (wood or steel framed construction). This technical bulletin notes that providing insulation over the entire opaque wall surface significantly increases the overall thermal performance and energy efficiency of a home and highlights how it protects from the ravages of moisture.

Included in this technical bulletin are a number of illustrations comparing Polyiso CI with other systems in connection with the transfer of moisture. A “Key Facts” summary provides a convenient reference of the important information contained in this document.

A link to PIMA Technical Bulletin #303 is provided here.

Tags:  building envelope  continuous insulation  Polyiso 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

PIMA Technical Bulletin #301: Polyiso Continuous Insulation (CI) Performance in Residential Wall Applications

Posted By Nathan Pobre, Wednesday, October 23, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, October 23, 2019
Technical Bulletin #301 looks at the use of Polyiso CI (with foil or coated glass facer) to provide a continuous layer of insulation on the exterior of residential housing (when used with wood or steel framed construction) to minimize thermal bridges and increase the overall thermal performance and energy efficiency of a home. This document covers various applications of Polyiso CI including: thermal insulation; thermal bridge reduction; water resistive barrier: air barrier; water vapor control; and fire performance.

Included in this technical bulletin are a number of illustrations comparing Polyiso CI with other insulation systems. A “Key Facts” summary and “Definitions” section provide addition and important information. A link to PIMA Technical Bulletin #301 is provided here.

Tags:  building envelope  continuous insulation  Efficiency  energy codes  insulation  Polyiso 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Polyiso Roof & Wall Insulation: Helping New International Concourse at LAX Meet the Codes

Posted By Nathan Pobre, Friday, May 3, 2019
Updated: Friday, May 3, 2019
The ongoing overhaul of the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), the nation’s third busiest airport, is a complex web of projects. One of its major components is the new Midfield Satellite Concourse (MSC) North, a five-level, 750,000 square-foot expansion accessible via a spacious 1,200 ft. long tunnel corridor with moving walkways from the Tom Bradley terminal. As with any major construction undertaking, the project is designed to meet a wide array of building codes, including the California Green Building Standards Code (CALGreen) mandatory sustainability related requirements, and its Tier 1 voluntary sustainability measures that each jurisdiction has the option to enforce.  

CALGreen is the first-in-the-nation mandatory state green building standards code. Developed in 2007, it targets the reduction of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) from buildings, while promoting environmentally responsible, cost-effective, healthier places to live and work. In order for the new MSC to meet the exacting CALGreen Tier 1 specifications, the thermal insulation used in the project had to meet key requirements that measured volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions. Designers worked to find a continuous insulation capable of reaching those goals and providing the durability and protection required for the high-demand building conditions.

Additionally, since the new concourse is designed to complement the ocean wave theme of the airport, the architects envisaged a stunning curvilinear roof. This unique design element demanded some additional roof and wall configuration requirements. The team needed insulation materials that could be custom fit to meet custom curvature and design needs.

The design and construction team began searching for an insulation solution that would meet or exceed all code and environmental requirements and provide the flexibility and ease of installation that would make it a viable option for such a large project. Atlas polyiso roof and wall insulation products were continually recommended by industry experts due to their low VOC emissions and optimal performance. Atlas polyiso roof and wall insulation products have passed the vigorous testing requirements for GREENGUARD Gold certification.

The size and scale of the project is significant. More than 500,000 square feet of polyiso are required on the roof and more than 215,000 square feet will be used in the walls to ensure top building performance by providing a high R-value, durability and water resistive barrier attributes available.

To find out more, click here for the full case study.

Tags:  building envelope  buildings  continuous insulation  energy efficiency  insulation  Polyiso  roofing 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

NFPA 285

Posted By Nathan Pobre, Wednesday, February 13, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, February 13, 2019

Improvements to the building envelope through the use of continuous insulation solutions have played a major role in mainstreaming high-performance construction practices that meet the requirements of commercial building energy codes. To meet the demands of today’s builds, architectural and design professionals must balance energy efficiency with whole building performance considerations, including fire safety. With respect to wall assemblies in Type I-IV Construction, understanding and properly implementing NFPA 285 can be a critical component for designing a compliant, high-performance building envelope.

NFPA 285 is a fire test standard that measures the flammability characteristics of exterior wall assemblies. More specifically, and according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), it “provides a standardized fire test procedure for evaluating the suitability of exterior, non-load bearing wall assemblies and panels used as components of curtain wall assemblies that are constructed using combustible materials or that incorporate combustible components for installation on buildings where the exterior walls are required to be non-combustible.” While the individual products used in the wall assembly carry product-specific fire tests, it is important that entire wall assemblies are tested to meet approved fire performance requirements and ensure the safety of the building occupants.

The NFPA 285 test is performed on both load-bearing and non-load-bearing wall assemblies. It requires a wall assembly mockup spanning two stories (18’ high) with a test room on each floor. A single window opening is provided in the first-story room where a test burner is located. This burner is ignited in order to simulate an interior room fire. A second burner located on the exterior side of the test wall further enhances the flames to the window header. The test simulates a common, real-world interior fire scenario that reaches flashover, breaches a window, and spreads upward along the wall face. The test examines fire performance of the entire wall assembly, including within the wall assembly. It’s important to note also that the test is conducted without any interior fire suppression system.

To pass the NFPA 285 test, flame propagation cannot occur on or within the wall assembly beyond a certain distance either vertically or laterally from the area of flame plume impingement. Thermocouples are placed throughout the wall assembly to measure temperatures. Exceeding defined temperature limits results in a test failure. Additional requirements include:

  • No flame propagation in second-floor room;
  • The inside wall assembly thermocouples shall not exceed 1000°F rise during the 30-minute test;
  • External flames shall not reach 10′ above the top of the window; and
  • The external flame shall not reach 5′ laterally from the center line of the window.

It is a common misconception that only foam insulation products trigger NFPA 285. While any wall containing foam plastic insulation in Types I-IV Construction must comply with the test requirements, the use of other wall assembly configurations may also need to pass NFPA 285. These assemblies can include those constructed with combustible claddings and weather resistant barriers.

Since 2000, NFPA 285 has been in the International Building Code (IBC) and has gained attention due to the increased diversity in exterior wall systems and greater compliance with building energy efficiency standards. To learn more about NFPA 285, please refer to the National Fire Protection Association.

Tags:  building codes  building envelope  fire performance  NFPA 285  Type I-IV 

PermalinkComments (0)