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Energy Conservation Lives!

Posted By Nathan Pobre, Friday, August 16, 2019
Updated: Friday, August 16, 2019
A recent Trump Administration document “encourages communities to adopt and enforce up-to-date building codes.” This important policy recommendation, contained in the Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA)’s National Mitigation Investment Strategy (NMIS), is expected to further catalyze code adoption and pave the way toward enforcement of these critical building standards.

The NMIS Recommendation 3.1 further states:
“Building codes regulate the design, construction, and occupancy of buildings and structures by providing minimum requirements to safeguard public safety, health and general welfare. Architects, engineers, builders, and regulators should use the latest building codes for the most up-to-date requirements for structural integrity, mechanical integrity, fire prevention and energy conservation. Using up-to-date building codes helps communities survive, remain resilient, and continue to provide essential services after a disaster occurs.”
 
This recommendation, combined with increased code adoption at the local level will be a powerful market signal. Further information and an explanation of the document is available here.

Tags:  building  building codes  buildings  construction  Disaster Preparedness  energy codes  energy efficiency  resiliency 

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The Overarching Impact of the Insulation Industry

Posted By Nathan Pobre, Wednesday, May 29, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, May 29, 2019
Insulation can be found in buildings, refrigeration and a multitude of other end use products, and is used for floatation and transportation. From an environmental standpoint, when insulation products such as Polyiso are used in building and construction, the purpose of the insulation is to stop the flow of air (hot or cold) through the exterior walls and roofs of a building. Reducing the air transfer reduces the amount of energy required to regulate a building’s heating and cooling system. As a result, the insulation has a direct impact on the cost and use of energy to run that building.

Beyond its sustainability and environmental attributes, a new report, “The Contributions Insulation to the U.S. Economy in 2018,” produced by the American Chemistry Council (ACC), shows that the insulation industry contributes significantly to the U.S. economy. In fact, the industry generates more than 550,000 jobs and $33 billion a year in payrolls. For extended details on the economic contributions, insulation industry segments, and more view the full study here.

 Attached Files:

Tags:  buildings  construction  continuous insulation  energy efficiency  insulation  manufacturing  Polyiso 

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Roofing Day

Posted By Administration, Thursday, April 11, 2019
Updated: Thursday, April 11, 2019

On April 4, 2019, as spring unfolded in Washington, D.C. with the arrival of the cherry blossoms, PIMA and a sea of more than 400 roofing industry professionals descended on Capitol Hill for meetings with Congressional representatives to discuss issues of importance to the entire roofing industry. PIMA and its member companies were there to advocate in support of three key issues:

  • A robust buildings component for infrastructure legislation.
  • Immigration reform that meets the roofing industry's workforce needs.
  • Expanded workforce training incentives.
There is strength in numbers and Roofing Day is an opportunity for the entire roofing industry to speak with one unified voice. Groups of roofing contractors, front-line workers, state and regional roofing associations, roofing manufacturers, distributors, and design and roof-consulting professionals participated in close to 300 Congressional meetings. Roofing Day 2019 had an increased participation of 5 percent compared to Roofing Day 2018.

Visiting Capitol Hill with hundreds of roofing industry professionals was powerful as were the connections that were made. Equally as powerful and valuable - the connections made among the attendees. For more information on Roofing Day, visit www.nrca.net/roofingday. And mark your calendars for Roofing Day 2020 – April 21-22, 2020!

Tags:  construction  insulation  jobs  Polyiso  resiliency  roofing 

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Storage and Handling Recommendations For Polyiso Roof Insulation

Posted By Administration, Thursday, March 21, 2019
Updated: Thursday, March 21, 2019

While it has been a long winter, spring is sure to get here sooner than we think, which means many roofing project will soon be underway. Here are key considerations (TB109) about the storage and handling of polyiso roof insulation on a job site:

Storage
Polyiso insulation is typically shipped protected by a plastic wrap, plastic bag or both. This factory packaging is intended for handling the polyiso in the manufacturing plant and during transit; it should not be relied upon as protection at jobsites or other outdoor storage locations unless specified otherwise by the manufacturer.

Material delivery should be carefully coordinated with the roof application schedule to minimize outdoor storage. When short-term outdoor storage is necessary, whether at grade or on the roof deck, the following precautions should be observed:

  • Bundles should be stored flat above the ground utilizing included feet or on raised pallets. If possible, the bundles should be placed on a finished surface such as gravel, pavement, or concrete rather than on dirt or grass.
  • Unless specified otherwise by the manufacturer, cover the package and pallet with a waterproof cover, and secure to prevent wind displacement.

Note: Polyiso insulation is fully cured and fit for installation upon delivery. No additional storage time is required.

Handling
Exercise care during handling of polyiso insulation to prevent breaking or crushing of the square edges and surfaces. Remove the polyiso bundles from trucks with proper equipment. Other means of mishandling, such as pushing pallets off the edge of the truck or “rolling” the pallet across the roof deck, must be avoided.

Product Application
Polyiso should always be installed on dry, clean roof decks in dry conditions. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations regarding product application to ensure performance to the intended design life of the roofing system. Apply only as much polyiso roof insulation as can be covered by completed roofing the same day.

Construction Traffic
Avoid excessive traffic during roof construction of or on a completed roof surface. Although polyiso has been designed to withstand limited foot traffic, protection from damage by construction traffic and/or abuse is extremely important. Roof surface protection such as plywood should be used in areas where storage and staging are planned and heavy or repeated traffic is anticipated during or after installation.

Some designers and membrane manufacturers specify the use of cover boards as a means of protecting the insulation. If specified, installers should ensure that the cover board used is compatible with all components of the roofing system, is acceptable to the membrane manufacturer, and meets specified fire, wind, and code requirements.

Polyiso roof insulation, like other roofing materials, requires a proper understanding of storage, handling, and application to result in a properly constructed roof system. You can find additional technical information about polyiso roof and wall insulation at polyiso.org.



Tags:  building site  construction  handling  insulation  Polyiso  storage 

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