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Michigan State Building Energy Code Update

Posted By Administration, Thursday, March 26, 2020
Updated: Friday, March 13, 2020

The applicable building energy code that determines the minimum insulation requirements for commercial roofs with insulation entirely above the deck in Michigan is the Commercial Michigan Energy Code (based on ASHRAE 90.1.-2013 with state-specific amendments). The minimum insulation requirements apply both to new construction and roof replacements on existing buildings.

The minimum requirement for insulation installed entirely above the roof deck is R-30 for climate zones 5 and 6, and R-35 for climate zone 7. This code became effective on September 20, 2017.

 Sample roof assembly diagrams and additional information can be found in PIMA’s Michigan code fact sheet.

Tags:  building codes  building envelope  buildings  Efficiency  energy codes  energy efficiency 

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Illinois State Building Energy Code Update

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, March 24, 2020
Updated: Friday, March 13, 2020
The applicable building energy code that determines the minimum insulation requirements for commercial roofs with insulation entirely above the deck in Illinois is the 2018 Illinois Energy Conservation Code (based on the 2018 International Energy Conservation Code with state-specific amendments). The minimum insulation requirements apply both to new construction and roof replacements on existing buildings.

The minimum requirement for insulation installed entirely above the roof deck is R-30 for all climate zones. This code is effective July 1, 2019.

 Sample roof assembly diagrams and additional information can be found in PIMA’s Illinois code fact sheet.

Tags:  building codes  building envelope  buildings  energy codes  energy efficiency  Polyiso 

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Georgia State Building Energy Code Update

Posted By Administration, Thursday, March 19, 2020
Updated: Friday, March 13, 2020

The applicable building energy code that determines the minimum insulation requirements for commercial roofs with insulation entirely above the deck in Georgia is the 2020 Georgia State Minimum Standard Energy Code (based on the 2015 IECC with state specific amendments). The minimum insulation requirements apply both to new construction and roof replacements on existing buildings.

The minimum requirement for insulation installed entirely above the roof deck is R-25 for climate zones 2 and 3, and R-30 for climate zone 4. This code became effective in January 1, 2020.

 Sample roof assembly diagrams and additional information can be found in PIMA’s Georgia code fact sheet.

Tags:  building codes  building envelope  buildings  energy codes  energy efficiency 

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Florida ​State Building Energy Code Update

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, March 17, 2020
Updated: Thursday, March 12, 2020

PIMA’s State Energy Code Fact Sheets provide state-by-state details about the minimum insulation requirements for low-slope commercial roofing in both new and existing buildings. Each fact sheet includes state-specific insulation requirements, code-compliant assembly examples, and links to helpful resources. PIMA monitors state codes regularly to provide the most up to date information possible.

The applicable building energy code that determines the minimum insulation requirements for commercial roofs with insulation entirely above the deck in Florida is the 2017 6th Edition Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation (based on the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code with state specific amendments). The minimum insulation requirements apply both to new construction and roof replacements on existing buildings.

The minimum requirement for insulation installed entirely above the roof deck is R-20 for climate zone 1 and R-25 for climate zone 2. This code became effective on December 31, 2017.

Sample roof assembly diagrams and additional information can be found in PIMA’s Florida code fact sheet.

Tags:  building codes  building envelope  Efficiency  energy codes  energy efficiency 

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Bellingham, Washington Home is Zero Energy, Zero Water and Zero Sewer

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, January 28, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, January 28, 2020
Located in the Birchwood neighborhood of Bellingham, Washington, lies the newly built Birch Home. The Birch Home is zero energy, zero water and zero sewer. Architect Dan Welch and builder Chris Tretwold of Tretwold Construction built the home to the high energy performance standards of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program and the home is now where Dan Welch and his wife reside. Welch had designed or consulted on several high-performance homes prior to this project, but this was the first home he actually built. Through careful thought, research and time, Welch and Tretwold were able to achieve this triple play in performance.

In order to make all aspects of The Birch home “zero,” different products and systems were used to ensure the building was as high performing as possible. Solar panels were used to produce energy while rainwater provides all the home’s water supply. Additionally, the home has about nine inches of polyiso insulation on the roof for maximum energy efficiency.

Learn more about this project here.

Tags:  building envelope  energy efficiency  resiliency 

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The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design at Georgia Tech Includes Polyiso

Posted By Administration, Monday, December 2, 2019
Updated: Monday, December 2, 2019

The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design (Kendeda Building) at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) was dedicated on October 24, 2019. Built in partnership with the Kendeda Fund, the 46,800-square-foot building is the first academic and research building in the Southeast to pursue the Living Building Challenge – the world’s most ambitious green building program.

The Kendeda Building will need to meet 20 “Imperatives” – which are specific performance requirements – after 12 consecutive months of operation. Certification is anticipated in 2021, and the project is also pursuing the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED certification at the Platinum level.

The project team used a three-inch base layer of non-halogenated GAF Polyiso roof insulation to cover nearly the entire roof and approximately 130 squares of material GAF TPO. This GAF polyiso insulation does not contain halogenated flame-retardant chemicals and offers:

  • A higher R-value per inch compared to non-polyiso types of insulation of equivalent thickness;
  • High moisture resistance;
  • Improved fire resistance;
  • Are lightweight for easy handling and installation;
  • Have zero ozone depletion potential and negligible global warming potential, and;
  • Manufactured with EPA-compliant blowing agents containing no CFCs or HCFs. 

The Kendeda Building will use just one-third the energy of a comparable building, will generate more energy than it uses from solar panels on its roof and will capture and treat rainwater for all purposes, including drinking. This is one of the reasons the project team chose to integrate tapered Polyiso roof insulation in addition to the flat material to help direct water into the capture systems.

The building includes classrooms, laboratories, offices, an auditorium, a student commons, and a roof garden with an apiary. The project offers unique learning opportunities for designers, builders, and building operators, such as how to tackle the region’s humidity and potential droughts.

The Living Building was funded through a $30 million grant from The Kendeda Fund, one of the leading philanthropic investors in civic and environmental programs in the Atlanta area with a commitment to ecological and social causes.

Tags:  buildings  energy efficiency  insulation  LEED  Polyiso  r-value 

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Energy Savings Go Through the Roof!

Posted By Administration, Monday, November 11, 2019
Updated: Monday, November 11, 2019
When it’s time to replace a roof, most owners choose roofing materials based on performance qualities like longevity and weather resistance. But a well-designed roof can also shine in another performance area: energy efficiency.

Energy efficiency is important to many owners with concerns ranging from climate impacts like building carbon footprints to the costs and reliability of energy resources. Since approximately 25 percent of heat loss in an uninsulated building occurs through the roof, choosing materials that add insulative power can add significant energy savings. For commercial and low-slope roof applications, adding layers of rigid foam insulation to the roofing system can deliver exceptional R-value without a lot of bulk.

An article last month from the Energy News Network details initiatives in Warren, Minnesota and Arnsberg, Germany to use thermal imaging in evaluating building heat loss to help owners determine the best energy efficiency opportunities.

The program was conceived after municipal leaders from Warren and Arnsberg met through the Climate-Smart Municipalities program sponsored by the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment which paired five cities in Minnesota with similar cities in Germany. Arnsberg had been using remote-piloted aircraft to collect thermal images of building heat loss. Leaders in Warren decided to try using drones to get more detailed information.

Piggybacking off each other’s ideas, the two cities are innovating the practical applications of these thermal images in directing energy efficiency efforts to the places that will have the greatest impact. Their research provides further evidence that reroofing with energy-efficient materials can decrease building heat loss and lead to reduced energy consumption.

Tags:  building envelope  buildings  continuous insulation  Efficiency  energy efficiency  insulation  Polyiso 

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PIMA Technical Bulletin #302: Wall Bracing with Polyiso Continuous Insulation (CI)

Posted By Administration, Monday, October 28, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, October 23, 2019
Technical Bulletin #302 presents several applications related to the proper use of the Polyiso CI, and highlights the importance of wall bracing to resist lateral loading conditions and meet residential building code requirements. Structural bracing requirements are described for both wood and steel framed residential construction in the document.

Included in this technical bulletin are illustrations related to the use of wall bracing with Polyiso CI that serve as helpful “how to” descriptions for installation of the product. Also included is a summary of “Key Facts” that reference important information contained in the document. A link to PIMA Technical Bulletin #302 is provided here.

Tags:  buildings  continuous insulation  energy codes  energy efficiency  Polyiso 

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Energy Conservation Lives!

Posted By Nathan Pobre, Friday, August 16, 2019
Updated: Friday, August 16, 2019
A recent Trump Administration document “encourages communities to adopt and enforce up-to-date building codes.” This important policy recommendation, contained in the Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA)’s National Mitigation Investment Strategy (NMIS), is expected to further catalyze code adoption and pave the way toward enforcement of these critical building standards.

The NMIS Recommendation 3.1 further states:
“Building codes regulate the design, construction, and occupancy of buildings and structures by providing minimum requirements to safeguard public safety, health and general welfare. Architects, engineers, builders, and regulators should use the latest building codes for the most up-to-date requirements for structural integrity, mechanical integrity, fire prevention and energy conservation. Using up-to-date building codes helps communities survive, remain resilient, and continue to provide essential services after a disaster occurs.”
 
This recommendation, combined with increased code adoption at the local level will be a powerful market signal. Further information and an explanation of the document is available here.

Tags:  building  building codes  buildings  construction  Disaster Preparedness  energy codes  energy efficiency  resiliency 

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New Wisconsin High School Uses Polyiso CI System

Posted By Nathan Pobre, Tuesday, June 18, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Voters in Verona, WI passed a referendum in 2017 to build a brand-new high school. Once the new school is ready, the existing campus will be renovated to become a middle school and then the existing middle school will be converted for use as a new elementary school. The ambitious plan was undertaken to invest in long-term solutions for the school district’s needs and as a result care was taken in designing a new high school that would perform well over the long haul.

Construction is now underway on the new high school, designed in a collaborative process with staff, students, and project team members to provide an adaptable and vibrant modern learning environment in a safe place to support the physical and emotional wellbeing of students. Responsive to the natural environment, the new high school maximizes views and daylighting and offers outdoor learning spaces. At the heart of the building is a three-story atrium to encourage socialization and collaboration. The 585,000-square-foot building is scheduled for completion in preparation for the 2020-2021 school year.

To keep the building comfortable throughout the changing seasons and to minimize its energy needs, the design team selected products for the walls that would provide maximum insulation with minimal maintenance. More than 100,000 square feet of Johns Manville 2 ½ inch foil-faced Polyiso CI boards are being used on the project. They offer a reflective foil facer on one side and a non-reflective facer on the other to provide exceptional heat, moisture and air control. When installed correctly the Polyiso CI system provides a layer of continuous insulation that eliminates the thermal bridges that cause heat loss.

Learn more about the project here.

Tags:  buildings  continuous insulation  energy efficiency  insulation  Polyiso 

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