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Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Posted By Administration, Thursday, April 18, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

The late Israel Asper, a philanthropist and founder of CanWest Global Communications Corporation, had a vision for a museum solely dedicated to the evolution, celebration, and future of human rights. The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR), the first museum of its kind in the world, is a fulfillment of that dream, with the intention of building not only a national hub for human rights learning and discovery, but to promote a new era of global human rights leadership.

The pioneering facility, located in downtown Winnipeg, aims to engage Canadians and international visitors in an immersive, interactive experience and to create inspiring encounters with the foundational principles of human rights, offering both the inspiration and tools to help visitors make a difference in the lives of others. Museum patrons are welcomed as partners on a journey to erase barriers and initiate meaningful, lasting change.

The project was a joint venture of Canadian municipal, provincial, and national governments as well as The Asper Foundation, who spearheaded the initiative and obtained generous private funding. Founded by the Canadian Parliament through amendments to the country’s Museums Act on March 13, 2008, the CMHR was established as a center of learning where Canadians and people from around the world can engage in discussion and commit to take action against hate and oppression.

This unique museum project also had unusual building requirements. Its roof is comprised of three sections:

  • a base with green roofing;
  • the “Cloud,” a wrapped section, which includes the glass tower; and 
  • the “Mountain.”

Winnipeg-based Oakwood Roofing was the contracting firm responsible for sections two and three of the roof. After receiving plans from the building’s design team, Oakwood did a careful assessment of the unique building and recommended some changes that would result in a better roofing system with easier installation. A roof system combining products from IKO was devised to meet the building’s particular needs. Two of its key components were polyiso roof insulation and a layer of high-density polyiso cover board which was added to provide durability to the roof surface and increase valuable insulative R-value to improve building energy performance.

Learn more about this project here.

Tags:  insulation  Polyiso  roofing 

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Polyiso Fire Performance

Posted By Administration, Thursday, April 11, 2019
Updated: Thursday, April 11, 2019

All construction materials, including insulation products like polyiso, must provide a suitable margin of fire safety. Polyiso insulation products are tested per material-specific tests as well as part of full assemblies that test fire performance as constructed. Importantly, polyiso possesses a high level of inherent fire resistance when compared to other insulations due to its unique structure of strong chemical bonds. These bonds result in improved high temperature resistance (up to 390 degrees F – more than twice the temperature resistance of some other building insulation products), which in turn leads to enhanced fire resistance. In addition, polyiso does not melt or drip when exposed to flame. The product forms a protective surface char that enhances its fire resistance in terms of reduced flame spread and the potential to contribute to flashover.

For more information on polyiso insulation’s performance in fire tests, consult the following Technical Bulletins:




Tags:  fire performance  insulation  NFPA 285  Polyiso 

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Roofing Day

Posted By Administration, Thursday, April 11, 2019
Updated: Thursday, April 11, 2019

On April 4, 2019, as spring unfolded in Washington, D.C. with the arrival of the cherry blossoms, PIMA and a sea of more than 400 roofing industry professionals descended on Capitol Hill for meetings with Congressional representatives to discuss issues of importance to the entire roofing industry. PIMA and its member companies were there to advocate in support of three key issues:

  • A robust buildings component for infrastructure legislation.
  • Immigration reform that meets the roofing industry's workforce needs.
  • Expanded workforce training incentives.
There is strength in numbers and Roofing Day is an opportunity for the entire roofing industry to speak with one unified voice. Groups of roofing contractors, front-line workers, state and regional roofing associations, roofing manufacturers, distributors, and design and roof-consulting professionals participated in close to 300 Congressional meetings. Roofing Day 2019 had an increased participation of 5 percent compared to Roofing Day 2018.

Visiting Capitol Hill with hundreds of roofing industry professionals was powerful as were the connections that were made. Equally as powerful and valuable - the connections made among the attendees. For more information on Roofing Day, visit www.nrca.net/roofingday. And mark your calendars for Roofing Day 2020 – April 21-22, 2020!

Tags:  construction  insulation  jobs  Polyiso  resiliency  roofing 

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Storage and Handling Recommendations For Polyiso Roof Insulation

Posted By Administration, Thursday, March 21, 2019
Updated: Thursday, March 21, 2019

While it has been a long winter, spring is sure to get here sooner than we think, which means many roofing project will soon be underway. Here are key considerations (TB109) about the storage and handling of polyiso roof insulation on a job site:

Storage
Polyiso insulation is typically shipped protected by a plastic wrap, plastic bag or both. This factory packaging is intended for handling the polyiso in the manufacturing plant and during transit; it should not be relied upon as protection at jobsites or other outdoor storage locations unless specified otherwise by the manufacturer.

Material delivery should be carefully coordinated with the roof application schedule to minimize outdoor storage. When short-term outdoor storage is necessary, whether at grade or on the roof deck, the following precautions should be observed:

  • Bundles should be stored flat above the ground utilizing included feet or on raised pallets. If possible, the bundles should be placed on a finished surface such as gravel, pavement, or concrete rather than on dirt or grass.
  • Unless specified otherwise by the manufacturer, cover the package and pallet with a waterproof cover, and secure to prevent wind displacement.

Note: Polyiso insulation is fully cured and fit for installation upon delivery. No additional storage time is required.

Handling
Exercise care during handling of polyiso insulation to prevent breaking or crushing of the square edges and surfaces. Remove the polyiso bundles from trucks with proper equipment. Other means of mishandling, such as pushing pallets off the edge of the truck or “rolling” the pallet across the roof deck, must be avoided.

Product Application
Polyiso should always be installed on dry, clean roof decks in dry conditions. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations regarding product application to ensure performance to the intended design life of the roofing system. Apply only as much polyiso roof insulation as can be covered by completed roofing the same day.

Construction Traffic
Avoid excessive traffic during roof construction of or on a completed roof surface. Although polyiso has been designed to withstand limited foot traffic, protection from damage by construction traffic and/or abuse is extremely important. Roof surface protection such as plywood should be used in areas where storage and staging are planned and heavy or repeated traffic is anticipated during or after installation.

Some designers and membrane manufacturers specify the use of cover boards as a means of protecting the insulation. If specified, installers should ensure that the cover board used is compatible with all components of the roofing system, is acceptable to the membrane manufacturer, and meets specified fire, wind, and code requirements.

Polyiso roof insulation, like other roofing materials, requires a proper understanding of storage, handling, and application to result in a properly constructed roof system. You can find additional technical information about polyiso roof and wall insulation at polyiso.org.



Tags:  building site  construction  handling  insulation  Polyiso  storage 

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Justin Koscher Featured Educational Speaker at 2019 RCI International Convention & Trade Show Monday, March 18, 2:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, March 5, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, March 5, 2019

PIMA President Justin Koscher along with Lorraine Ross of Intech Consulting, Inc. will present at the RCI convention to provide U.S. practitioners with answers, information, and guidance on how to harmonize the goals of building fire safety and energy efficiency. Information presented will be derived from consensus codes and standards, industry research and testing, and best practice guidance documents.

The tragic June 2017 fire at the Grenfell Tower in London has led British authorities to conduct a comprehensive review of building fire regulations intended to provide answers on how the fire occurred and what should be done to prevent a future tragedy. The Grenfell Tower fire has communities outside of England asking, could this type of fire happen here?

The presentation will:

  • Highlight specifically how U.S. codes and standards create a system approach to controlling the use of foam plastic insulation products in commercial buildings of varying heights
  • Detail resources that are available to help ensure buildings here in the U.S. are built and renovated to greatly reduce fire incidents and losses when fires do occur
  • Present examples of approved assemblies in a variety of exterior walls that utilize foam plastic insulation for different construction configurations
  • Provide guidance on how fire safety can be maintained throughout the design process and construction phases

Tags:  building codes  fire performance  insulation  NFPA 285 

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Nothing But the Best for the Big Ten: Terra Cotta Rainscreen Wall System With Continuous Insulation on New Headquarters Provides Style and Performance

Posted By Nathan Pobre, Tuesday, February 19, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, February 19, 2019
Since its inception in 1895, the Big Ten Conference has pioneered standards of excellence for intercollegiate sports. It should be no surprise then that the design of its headquarters building in Rosemont, Illinois features the construction industry’s highest performing products. In the Midwest, where temperatures can swing 100 degrees between winter and summer, the effectiveness of a building’s envelope, in particular, is a major factor on interior comfort, energy efficiency, and building durability.

Echoing the red brick buildings on the college campuses the Big Ten represents, designers chose a terra cotta rainscreen wall system that creates a striking façade for the 50,000-square-foot building. The tiles themselves are 12 x 48-inch panels with a bright red-orange color and a smooth finish. Their distinctive color is created using a single-clay composition, but there is a range of natural variations that enhance visual interest. The panels weren’t chosen just for their looks though. Each piece incorporates self-supporting extruded clay cleats that eliminate the need for metal support clips during the installation process—reducing costs and install time.

The terra cotta tiles are only the most exterior of the layers that wrap the Big Ten headquarters’ building envelope. These layers, called an open-joint rainscreen system, allow pressure to be equalized in the space between two exterior wall components so weather elements don’t reach the inner wall (rainscreen), which contains the moisture barrier and other critical components. This makes the building mold and mildew resistant—a huge bonus in an area known for its summer humidity. The panels are attached to exterior cold-formed metal framing, which supports the rainscreen system to resist the wind and snow loads for the Chicago area.

Behind the framing is the workhorse of the wall assembly, a commercial-grade insulation from Portland, ME-based Hunter Panels. The continuous insulation system used was manufactured at the local Hunter plant in Chicago. Continuous insulation, as its name suggests, covers the entire wall surface, with the obvious exception of windows, doors, and fasteners, minimizing heat loss and thermal bridging that is inevitable in systems that only insulate between the studs. Hunter’s Polyiso foam-board insulation with foil facers on both sides offers R-values from 6.3 to 19.5 in a single layer—a marked improvement over other insulation options. Since the insulation panels incorporate the moisture barrier required to protect the building, they also eliminate a step from the installation process.

Even though the construction team was unfamiliar with some of the wall system’s elements before this job, they were able to quickly master the installation techniques. The entire exterior took only six months to install and the Big Ten will be reaping benefits of such a maintenance-free and energy-efficient system for decades to come.


 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  building  continuous insulation  energy efficiency  insulation  Polyiso  rainscreen 

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Polyiso Continuous Insulation

Posted By Administration, Monday, February 11, 2019
Updated: Monday, February 11, 2019

Improvements to model energy codes are boosting advances in the use of insulation for commercial and residential building envelopes. Continuous insulation (CI) is quickly becoming the standard for high-performance building due to its ability to greatly improve operational performance while simplifying design and installation. In the ASHRAE 90.1 standard, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-rise Residential Buildings, CI is defined as: "Insulation that is continuous across all structural members without thermal bridges other than fasteners and service openings. It is installed on the interior, exterior, or is integral to any opaque surface of the building envelope."

CI is one of the most thermally efficient ways of complying with modern energy codes and mitigates energy loss that commonly results from thermal bridging. A thermal bridge, also called a cold bridge, heat bridge, or thermal bypass, is an area with higher thermal conductivity than the surrounding materials—like the studs of a wall that have batt insulation between them, creating a path of least resistance for heat transfer. In an otherwise insulated building, thermal bridges can account for up to 30 percent of energy loss. Using CI, the insulation doesn’t skip over studs or other obstructions in the wall cavity; it covers the entire surface. This results in:

  • Increased thermal performance
    By blocking thermal bridging, a continuous insulation system increases the overall thermal performance of a wall assembly and a building.

  • Reduced operating costs
    Continuous insulation keeps energy and heat loss to a minimum, increasing the building’s energy efficiency and leading to lower monthly operating costs.

  • Reduced air infiltration and exfiltration
    Continuous insulation with taped or sealed joints restricts air movement through the wall, helping to further reduce building heat loss.

The benefits of certain CI solutions go beyond enhanced energy efficiency. For example, polyiso insulation can serve as an air barrier, water resistant barrier, and water vapor control/retarder in wall assemblies. These capabilities provide the following additional benefits:

  • Reduced risk of water condensation and moisture intrusion
    Continuous insulation is a very moisture-resistant system, guarding the thermal and structural performance of the building.
  • Efficient installation
    When used as sheathing, continuous insulation can simplify the steps to construct a code-compliant wall assembly.
  • Dimensional Stability
    Polyiso insulation has excellent dimensional stability and meets ASTM C1289 Standard Specification for Faced Rigid Cellular Polyisocyanurate Thermal Insulation Board.

There are a multitude of building envelope product options, and a variety of design and construction methods used for achieving compliance with code requirements for the thermal envelope. To learn more about polyiso CI systems and their tried and true methods to meet these requirements refer to PIMA Technical Bulletin #403: “Continuous Insulation Using Polyiso Wall Sheathing” and this AIA CEU course which covers:

  • The different roles a product can play in the building envelope to simplify its design.
  • The code requirements for buildings classified as International Building Code Type I-IV Construction.
  • Strategies for achieving code compliance.
  • How polyiso can play multiple roles to meet or exceed these code requirements.
     

Tags:  insulation  polyiso  r-value  Type I-IV 

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Newest Shiloh House in Colorado Uses Polyiso Wall Boards for Superior Thermal and Weather Barrier

Posted By Administration, Thursday, February 7, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, February 6, 2019

When Colorado architects from the Davis Partnership were designing a new building for the non-profit Shiloh House, they were thrilled to find a product that would protect the building envelope from exposure to fire, water, and wind while integrating a continuous insulation system that would provide long-term thermal efficiency. The polyiso wall insulation solution from Rmax gave them flexibility to use a variety of external claddings for visual interest without compromising on protection from the elements and energy savings. Even better, with the help of Rmax’s in-house architect and field team, they were able to design a wall system with smooth, on-time installation that meet the rigorous NFPA 285 requirements.

Shiloh House has five locations across Colorado that offer nurturing, therapeutic and educational services aimed to help youth and families to overcome the impact of abuse, neglect and trauma. They helped over 1,000 youth last year alone.

This new facility in Centennial is situated on a 1.54-acre property and includes on-site parking, outdoor courtyards, and the spaces and amenities that support the group’s programming to promote family stability and help families achieve their goals, while ensuring continued access to community resources once Shiloh House services have been successfully completed.

For an organization with such lofty goals, every dollar saved in building operations is another resource that can be used to serve its mission. The Rmax polyiso wall boards provide continuous insulation—eliminating heat lost that could occur through the studs when insulating with traditional products that are installed only in the wall cavities—and have reinforced aluminum foil facers that offer enhanced durability, dimensional stability and greater radiant heat protection. They make it easier and less expensive to keep the building comfortable, no matter the weather conditions outside.

“When we’re designing a building, we try to meet the highest standards because we care about protecting the environment and saving our client money over the whole life of their building by maximizing energy efficiency,” the architects explained. “With a reliable weather barrier and superior insulative properties, the polyiso continuous insulation system really gives your building the best protection while actually saving time and hassle on installation since it includes multiple protective layers in a single product.”

And the finished product speaks for itself:

Aerial views: www.rmax.com/aerial-videos

Project Gallery: www.rmax.com/shiloh-house-project-gallery

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  energy efficiency  insulation  NFPA 285  Polyiso  thermal efficiency  wall 

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Chicago Area Cold Storage Facility Looks to Polyiso & TPO for a Massive 236,000 SF Roof Upgrade

Posted By Administration, Monday, October 29, 2018
Updated: Monday, October 29, 2018
When a 1979 Chicago area cold-storage warehouse needed a roof upgrade, Polyiso insulation was a critical component of the new roof system.

Owned by CenterPoint Properties, the largest owner/developer of industrial real estate in the greater Chicago area, the building required a roof system that replaced the15 year old 236,000-square-foot BUR roof system with efficiency and longevity in mind.

The old roofing system leaked, including at the drains and field seams. The roof had overlay work from several past repairs and an uneven surface with obsolete mechanical units, which were removed.

The building is located in Hodgkins, Ill., where the tenant, Fresh Logistics, consolidates daily rail shipments of produce from key agricultural areas in California and Washington for distribution. Along with the new roof, an efficient and consistent temperature-controlled facility was critical to Fresh Logistics daily operations.

After the existing roof was torn off, two staggered layers of 2” Polyiso insulation, was topped with 60-mil energy efficient TPO (thermoplastic polyolefin) membrane. This system allowed the contractor to use 70 percent fewer seams than the previous roof.

The roof system offers a cost-effective solution that provides a flat, clean, energy efficient roofing solution. Since the building has a temperature-controlled environment, the reflectivity of the 60-mil TPO keeps the building cooler and the four inches of insulation provide the proper R-value.

The roof was installed by Northcross Roofing and Waterproofing, Inc.

You can read more about this project here.

Tags:  Efficiency  insulation  Polyiso  roofing 

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The Far-Reaching Impact of the Insulation Industry

Posted By Nathan Pobre, Monday, September 10, 2018
Updated: Monday, September 10, 2018

Insulation can be found in buildings, refrigeration and a multitude of other end use products, and is used for floatation and transportation.

From an environmental standpoint, when insulation products such as Polyiso are used in building and construction, the purpose of the insulation is to stop the flow of air (hot or cold) through the exterior walls and roofs of a building. Reducing the air transfer reduces the amount of energy required to regulate a building’s heating and cooling system. As a result, the insulation has a direct impact on the cost and use of energy to run that building.

Beyond its sustainability and environmental attributes, a new report, “The Contributions Insulation to the U.S. Economy in 2017,” produced by the American Chemistry Council (ACC), shows that the insulation industry contributes significantly to the U.S. economy. In fact, the industry generates more than 500,000 jobs and $30 billion a year in payrolls.

“This report makes clear that the business of manufacturing, distributing and installing insulation generates significant economic output and creates jobs across the country,” says Martha Gilchrist Moore, senior director of policy analysis and economics at ACC and author of the report. The impact is significant and key findings about the insulation industry’s contributions to the U.S. economy are detailed in the infographic below.

For extended details on the economic contributions, insulation industry segments, and more view the full study here.

Tags:  buildings  insulation  jobs  manufacturing  payroll  tax revenue 

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